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Wednesday, June 08, 2005

ANOTHER THEORY! WHEN WILL THEY EVER LEARN?

Jesus 'died of blood clot'

AN Israeli researcher has challenged the popular belief that Jesus died of blood loss on the cross, saying he probably succumbed to a sometimes fatal disorder now associated with long-haul air travel. Jesus's death, traditionally believed to have occurred three to six hours after crucifixion began, was probably caused by a blood clot that reached his lungs, Benjamin Brenner wrote in The Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Such pulmonary embolisms, leading to sudden death, can stem from immobilisation, multiple trauma and dehydration, Professor Brenner, a researcher at Rambam Medical Centre in Haifa, wrote in the article based on religious and medical texts.

"This fits well with Jesus's condition and actually was in all likelihood the major cause of death by crucifixion."

A 1986 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association mentioned the possibility that Jesus had suffered a blood clot but concluded he died of blood loss.

But Professor Brenner said research into blood coagulation had made significant strides over the past two decades.

Recent medical research had linked immobility among passengers on lengthy air flights to deep vein thrombosis, popularly known as 'economy-class syndrome', in which potentially fatal blood clots could develop, usually in the lower legs, he said.

Professor Brenner noted Jesus underwent scourging before crucifixion, but he concluded "the amount of blood loss by itself" would not have killed Jesus.

Jesus, as a Jew from what is now northern Israel, could have been at particular risk to a fatal blood clot as thrombophilia, a rare condition in which blood has an increased tendency to clot, was common to natives of Galilee, the researcher wrote.

This is from Albert Barnes Notes On The Bible, judge for yourself...

Mat 27:46 -
Eli, Eli ... - This language is not pure Hebrew nor Syriac, but a mixture of both, called commonly “Syro-Chaldaic.” This was probably the language which the Saviour commonly spoke. The words are taken from Psa_22:1.

My God, my God ... - This expression is one denoting intense suffering. It has been difficult to understand in what sense Jesus was “forsaken by God.” It is certain that God approved his work. It is certain that he was innocent. He had done nothing to forfeit the favor of God. As his own Son - holy, harmless, undefiled, and obedient - God still loved him. In either of these senses God could not have forsaken him. But the expression was probably used in reference to the following circumstances, namely:

1. His great bodily sufferings on the cross, greatly aggravated by his previous scourging, and by the want of sympathy, and by the revilings of his enemies on the cross. A person suffering thus might address God as if he was forsaken, or given up to extreme anguish.

2. He himself said that this was “the power of darkness,” Luk_22:53. It was the time when his enemies, including the Jews and Satan, were suffered to do their utmost. It was said of the serpent that he should bruise the heel of the seed of the woman, Gen_3:15. By that has been commonly understood to be meant that, though the Messiah would finally crush and destroy the power of Satan, yet he should himself suffer “through the power of the devil.” When he was tempted Luke 4, it was said that the tempter “departed from him for a season.” There is no improbability in supposing that he might be permitted to return at the time of his death, and exercise his power in increasing the sufferings of the Lord Jesus. In what way this might be done can be only conjectured. It might be by horrid thoughts; by temptation to despair, or to distrust God, who thus permitted his innocent Son to suffer; or by an increased horror of the pains of dying.

3. There might have been withheld from the Saviour those strong religious consolations, those clear views of the justice and goodness of God, which would have blunted his pains and soothed his agonies. Martyrs, under the influence of strong religious feeling, have gone triumphantly to the stake, but it is possible that those views might have been withheld from the Redeemer when he came to die. His sufferings were accumulated sufferings, and the design of the atonement seemed to require that he should suffer all that human nature “could be made to endure” in so short a time.

4. Yet we have reason to think that there was still something more than all this that produced this exclamation. Had there been no deeper and more awful sufferings, it would be difficult to see why Jesus should have shrunk from these sorrows and used such a remarkable expression. Isaiah tells us Isa_53:4-5 that “he bore our griefs and carried our sorrows; that he was wounded for our transgressions, and bruised for our iniquities; that the chastisement of our peace was laid upon him; that by his stripes we are healed.” He hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us Gal_3:13; he was made a sin-offering 2Co_5:21; he died in our place, on our account, that he might bring us near to God. It was this, doubtless, which caused his intense sufferings. It was the manifestation of God’s hatred of sin, in some way which he has not explained, that he experienced in that dread hour. It was suffering endured by Him that was due to us, and suffering by which, and by which alone, we can be saved from eternal death.

GBYAY

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